About Us

About Faith Mennonite Church
Join us for WorshipContact Us
A Mennonite Church in the Seward Neighborhood of Minneapols

All are welcome

Introduction

Faith Mennonite Church is a Christ-centered community that seeks to be a place of welcome and nurture for all.

Our lives are guided by the life of Jesus and the historic peace position of the Mennonite Church. Our members are people from varied religious backgrounds and diverse cultures, gay and straight, young and old. We invite you to join us in being a sign of God’s healing and hope in our community and world. We are committeed to respect and peacefulness on our relationships. We have this expectation of all who gather here.

Join us for worship!

Sundays at 9:30 a.m.
2720& E 22nd St., Minneapolis, MN 55406

priorities that shape Faith Mennonite church’s ministry

Our Vision

We are a community that takes our faith in Jesus seriously.

We seek to work out our faith together, allowing space for questioning and being honest about our doubts.

We recognize that this requires creative ways of connecting outside of Sunday morning, though we struggled to make that space in our busy lives.

We seek to listen to one another, to build authentic, intimate relationships where we feel safe and develop a deep sense of belonging.

We value community. We want to be vulnerable enough to ask for help and to show our care for each other in practical ways in times of crisis and of joy.

We desire to build deep relationships, to learn the skills for developing trust and compassion, dealing with differences and resolving conflict.

We seek ways to promote peace and justice in our relationships, in our neighborhoods and in the world.

We desire spiritual growth. We want to be in a community that challenges us to a deeper commitment to following Jesus Christ.

We seek to explore, find and demonstrate alternative ways of living in the world that are less driven by the cultural values of the dominant society.

We value mentorship and wisdom among generations, so that children and young people are nurtured in faith and inspired to orient their lives around Christ.

We aspire to welcome all people to our fellowship and shared worship.

We prioritize caring for the earth and its inhabitants, and seek to integrate creation care into all elements of our congregational worship, community and mission.  

We seek to be good stewards of our local environments, acknowledging that we live, work, and worship on stolen Dakota land.

 

History of our Congregation

Meet our pastor and staff

Service and Justice

Activities and Community Life

Sunday Worship – We gather each Sunday at 9:30 a.m. in the sanctuary for worship. Learn more

Christian Education – From September to May, we offer Christian Education for all ages, beginning at 11 a.m. Learn more

Potlucks & Socials – We llike sharing meals at Faith Mennonite Church! Throughout the year we hold monthly potlucks and social events. View events calendar for upcoming dates

Fall Retreat – Each fall our congregation spends a weekend enjoying time together in a beautiful location. This is a time for getting to know each other better, retreating from city life, and focusing on a topic that is of interest to our congregation. View events calendar for upcoming date

Youth Group – FMC youth enjoy meeting together and engaging in community service activities. Learn more

Welcoming Statement

We have many LGBTQIA+ members and all kinds of families at Faith Mennonite Church. We have welcomed LGBTQIA+ folks into membership and leadership since 1996. When we say “all are welcome,” we mean it!

Borrowed from Pittsburgh Mennonite Church. Do we have a similar statement?
We recognize the sacred worth and dignity of all people and celebrate the image of God manifested in the mosaic of our community.  We are enriched by diversity in race, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, ability, physical and mental health, education, economic standing, and marital status.  These beautiful manifestations of difference stand as a call to be in 
relationship with each other, never an excuse to limit membership or interrupt fellowship in church.  God has welcomed us all.

Our denomination

About Mennonites

Mennonite Beliefs
  • Following Jesus in daily life is a central value.

  • We believe that it is possible to follow Jesus as Lord above nationalism, racism, or materialism.

  • We believe that it is possible to follow Jesus as a peacemaker. We believe that we can practice the way of Jesus’ reconciling love in human conflicts and warfare, without having to strike out in fear to defend ourselves.

  • We believe that we can live life simply and in service to others as a witness to God’s love for the world.

Mennonites are Christians known for their emphasis on issues such as peace, justice, simplicity, community, service, and mutual aid.

Mennonites believe in the close textual readings of the Scriptures and a personal spiritual responsibility as the basis of their faith. Radical from the beginning, but later considered conservative in many of their beliefs, Mennonites have come to represent a spectrum of backgrounds and beliefs.

Pacifism is one of the cornerstones of the Mennonite faith, prompting many young Mennonites to elect service to the church rather than military service. The Mennonite church emphasizes service to others as an important way of expressing one’s faith. A disproportionately large number of Mennonites spend part of their lives working as missionaries or volunteers helping those in need, nationally or internationally, through agencies such as Mennonite Mission Network or Mennonite Central Committee.

View the full Confession of Faith in a Mennonite Perspective.

Mennonite History

Mennonites are a branch of the Christian church with roots in the radical wing of the 16th-century Protestant Reformation. Part of the group known as Anabaptists (because they rebaptized adult believers), the Mennonites took their name from Menno Simons, a Dutch priest who converted to the Anabaptist faith and helped lead it to prominence in Holland by the mid-16th century. Modern day Mennonites number almost 1 million worldwide, with churches in North and South America, Africa, Europe and Asia.

The first Mennonites came mainly from Swiss and German roots, with many of the important martyrs of the early church coming from the area around Zurich. To escape persecution, many Mennonites fled western Europe for the more accommodating religious climate of the Americas or Catherine the Great’s Russia, giving these two groups distinctly different cultural heritages. When the Russian Mennonites were eventually forced out of Russia in the last half of the 19th Century and the early 20th Century, many migrated to the western states and provinces, where today there is a large Mennonite population. Many people in the older generation of this group continue to speak a low german dialect called “Plautdietsch” and eat traditional foods. Swiss German Mennonites migrated to North America in the 18th and 19th centuries, settling first in Pennsylvania, then eventually across the Midwestern states. They too brought with them their own traditions, including hearty foods and the German language. Today large Mennonite populations can be found in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Kansas, although Mennonites live in all parts of the United States and the world.

The Amish, who separated from the Mennonites in the late 1600’s, are widely known for their plain dress and rejection of modern technology and conveniences. Unlike the Mennonites, they form an exclusive and tight-knit community, with the church dictating much of what may or may not be done: for example, each local church district would dictate rules regarding the use of telephones, if indeed they are permitted at all. While certain conservative branches of the Mennonite church still dress simply and require women to wear head coverings, Mennonites generally are not culturally separatist, choosing to embrace the larger communities outside of their church rather than forming a separate community around the church. Where the Amish believe in keeping themselves spiritually focused by limiting their interaction with modern society, Mennonites believe in practicing Jesus’ teaching of service to others in a broader context.

–John D. Roth

Mennonite Church USA

Mennonite Church USA (MCUSA) is an Anabaptist denomination with roots in the Radical Reformation of 16th-century Europe. MCUSA has more than 62,000 adult members in about 565 congregations across the country. It is the largest of numerous Mennonite groups in the United States.

Find more information about MCUSA and our faith.

Mennonite congregations in the Twin Cities and Minnesota

Faith Mennonite Church is one of several Mennonite congregations and communities in Minnesota. We encourage collaboration among our churches. Find the websites, locations, and contact info of other Mennonite churches in Minnesota.

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